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Author Topic: 1300 - My first cambelt change (ever) : Checklist  (Read 353 times)
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Modano
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« on: June 19, 2022, 04:14:05 PM »

Hi
I've been collecting info through books, tech data, forum topics and I wanted to share my thoughts and prepare my homework.
Sorry in advance for being detailed, but I'll do the job alone, and this will be my first cambelt change ever. I saw one with the previous owner 10 years ago.
The Tensioner part was taken from the book "Twin Cam Italia". Not sure about this procedure.

The engine is a 1300 828C3, car is on jacks, wheel removed.
I took the same cambelt reference as the last time it was done (10 years ago, 10 kms mileage), a Contitech CT651 (144 teeth).
I changed the tensioner bearing back in 2006 (QTT163 - Ext diam 67mm, width 26.5mm) but it shows sign of aging (superficial rust and grease coming out) - see pictures. The first point would be to ask myself : shall I change that (either the bearing or the whole assy), although I think this would be better.
Other info : the crank pulley is not removable. 2 different mechanics tried in the past, never were able to remove it. I certainly won't be, either.

I first took a bunch of pictures with crankshaft at TDC. All marks seem OK, all have existing white paint marks, although I think the Aux Shaft is one degree left as per the 34į and pictures, it seems the hole is rather on the centerside of the bearing plate nut, instead of being on the "left" part. (see pictures). You can also see the global wear of the belt. We can see micro cracks on the tensioner picture (maybe they won't show on the reduced sized pictures)


Now, the process.
-The alternator belt was removed.
-I removed the yellow cover
-Remove the spark plugs (car won't move, it is jacked)
- Remove the water pump pulley

In case I don't change the bearing/tensioner pulley :
- Release the tension (this is where I'm really not sure to understand). If we see picture (with labels 1-5) , my guess would be to unscrew a little bit "4", push the spring "2" with a hammer handle in order for the whole plate to "pivot to the left" so that the tensioner pulley loosens its tension, allowing for the removal of the cambelt. Then screw to block the spring in that position.

- Remove the old cambelt
- Fit the new one by starting on the crankshaft (remember I cannot remove the CS pulley), then the aux (minding not to move it), then the Tensioner, the Exhaust Cam and then finally the inlet (by "pressing the belt flat against the inlet cam wheel").
- Unscrew nut "4" so that the tensioner pulley will move towards its natural position (through the spring force), screw nut 4 again
- Perform a manual turn of the crankshaft, Unscrew Nut "4" again to release full force
- Perform two or more manual turns of the crankshaft to sense any blocking point. Check timing marks on all cams and Aux shaft.
- Screw nut "4" once for all
- Start engine and perform ignition timing

What do you think ?







* aux1.jpg (118.04 KB, 640x480 - viewed 139 times.)

* wear.jpg (105.06 KB, 640x480 - viewed 138 times.)

* tensionerpulley.jpg (99.21 KB, 640x480 - viewed 141 times.)

* wear2.jpg (90.89 KB, 640x480 - viewed 139 times.)

* tensioner.jpg (111.25 KB, 640x480 - viewed 138 times.)
« Last Edit: June 19, 2022, 07:26:21 PM by Modano » Logged
SanRemo78
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« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2022, 06:49:57 PM »

Once you've changed the belt remove the plugs and turn the engine over by hand (using a socket/drive on the crankshaft nut). That'll confirm that the pistons and valves aren't in contact and don't forget to tighten up the tensioner bolt once you're done. Just a caveat! It's been a while since I changed a belt!
Guy
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Modano
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« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2022, 07:25:54 PM »

Yes thanks.
Leaving the plugs only make sense if I remove the crankshaft pulley.
Iíll update my post Smiley
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peteracs
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Peter Stokes


« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2022, 07:42:15 PM »

Hi

On the crank pulley, ideally I would want to remove it. Makes the job much easier and less chance of damaging the belt. I have done it both ways, hence the comment. I used a rattle gun on a few engines and eventually the nut came loose. Depending on your engine you may need a reasonably high power one.

Peter
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Modano
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« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2022, 08:12:45 PM »

Hi

On the crank pulley, ideally I would want to remove it. Makes the job much easier and less chance of damaging the belt. I have done it both ways, hence the comment. I used a rattle gun on a few engines and eventually the nut came loose. Depending on your engine you may need a reasonably high power one.

Peter
Thanks.
I might check to borrow one or rent one then?Ö I guess it may add a little trickery if I donít remove it (I guess you always need to pull the belt to make sure itís inserted properlyÖ
But I remember my mechanic told me he tried for a long time unsuccessfully , with all his experience and tools. Iím afraid this one is really Badly seized
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WestonTB
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« Reply #5 on: June 27, 2022, 08:31:44 PM »

Hi There,

Don't worry too much about the Aux pully moving out of line with the 1300 & 1600's, you will be fine if it moves, just aim for getting it spot on. It is only on the 2.0 that it is critical that the Aux pulley marks are 100% , it is also super easy to move the Aux pulley once the belt is off.

I would say replacement of the tensioner bearing is just a important as the belt change, to make life easier put the bearing ( from Mark@Betaboyz of course!) in the freezer for a few hours and the tensioner pulley in the oven (circa 200deg for approximately 10 min, I don't put salt & pepper on mine!!!) Sensible gloves and the very cold bearing will fall straight in no problems.

My crank pulley on my 2.0 is also 'fused' on but being an ex i.e engine there is loads of space to thread the belt round, look, move & check teeth located.

The Haynes manual is useful & any Guy Croft tips are excellent, trial & error are needed as is measure 10 times... cut once, don't rush, step by step, come back too the next day if necessary & no resistance should be felt when turning over with 38mm socket & plugs out, then and only then when you are happy give fuel & spark!  Smiley
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Modano
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« Reply #6 on: July 02, 2022, 06:00:01 PM »

Thanks.
So you advise to change the bearing alone (not the whole assembly), ie from this part : https://353652584127257704.weebly.com/store/p118/Cambelt_Tensioner_Bearing_All_Models.html (Do you know who manufactures this bearing ?)
I'll need to sandpaper the pulley as it has a couple of very light rust spot (at least aside the belt path). If I remember correctly (I hate my 10 years younger self for throwing the old one) the pulley is maintained with a simple circlip.

PS: I'm still unsure about the releasing of the tensioner pulley spring (well, unsure about everything related to this pulley), see my first post about which steps to release the tension Sad
« Last Edit: July 02, 2022, 06:03:10 PM by Modano » Logged
Nigel
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« Reply #7 on: July 03, 2022, 05:53:20 PM »

Hi Modano,
That is the correct bearing as listed.

You can use a large screwdriver or pry-bar to let off the tension.
It's not too difficult.

Hope this helps and good luck,

Nigel
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WestonTB
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« Reply #8 on: July 05, 2022, 10:52:26 PM »

Hi Modano,

The bearing is SKF, Mark always has the right ones at the right price. You are right, getting the tensioner right does involve a bit of spanner twiddling! Eric Weston & HF Stuart are the aces at this but as I see it you do of course have to undo the M10 (I think?!) 17mm nut to remove the tensioner bearing/ pulley assembly which can be tight ish' against the inner wing, then also loosen but do not remove the 13mm M8 shaped/contoured bolt ,no3 on your image, also loosen the 13mm M8 bolt & do not remove it ( no4 on your image)

Careful prying with a strong flat bladed screwdriver will release the spring from the backing plate, be careful not to catch/lean on any bits of distributor/wiring etc, with new tensioner bearing/pulley assembly back on I put the spring back in place, nip up the 13mm bolts (but do not tighten fully) , then with strong flat bladed screw driver add tension to the pulley and locate/lock in place with the 17mm locknut (no5 in your image)

Then when happy with tension fully tighten the 13mm bolts & start the measuring 10 times cutting once procedure of turning over with 38mm socket before adding spark & fuel.

It goes without saying to make sure you are happy with bolt no 5 (17mm one) is locating its stepped washer properly in the centre of the bearing and every thing turns as it should.

Enjoy !  Smiley
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HFStuart
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« Reply #9 on: July 10, 2022, 06:59:29 PM »

It's been a while since I've done one but I think you can leave bolt 4 alone. Crack bolt 3 undone slightly and loosen nut 5 a couple of turns. Turn the engine over by hand a couple of times like that and then nip up bolt 5 and bolt 3. Check the timing marks (it should be fine) and you should find the belt tension is about right without having to lever the tensioner pulley about  - the spring is supposed to do the work.

Assuming all is well torque the bolts up and you're good to go.

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