Lancia Beta Forum
October 16, 2018, 04:32:27 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Looking for Lancia Beta Parts
Lots of new items recently added
see: www.lanciabetaparts.co.uk
 
   Home   Help Contact Admin Search Calendar Gallery Donations Articles Login Register  
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Converting wheel bolts to studs/nuts  (Read 179 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
mangocrazy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 516


« on: July 30, 2018, 10:28:16 PM »

Has anyone considered converting the standard Beta arrangement of wheel attachment using bolts to stud and wheel nut? It would make for much easier wheel mounting, as the studs would provide a natural guide to centre/align the wheel. Are there drawbacks to this arrangement? I guess over time the studs might get the thread chewed by removal/refitting of wheels, but other than that are there any downsides? I see plenty of conversion kits available on eBay.
Logged

1980 Lancia Beta Spider 2000 (S2FL)
2002 VW Transporter T4
2008 Aprilia SL1000 Falco
1992 Ducati 888 SP3
1988 Honda VFR750F
HFStuart
Legendary Member
******
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 1576



« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2018, 12:35:41 PM »

There's no danger of damaging steel bolts with alloy wheels. I can't see a disadvantage. On the other hand the Beta wheels are pretty light so I've never had too much trouble. My 406 Coupe (many other cars too I expect) comes with a locating pin you screw into a bolt hole before mounting the wheel - you could fabricate one of those without trouble.
Logged
mangocrazy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 516


« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2018, 05:01:38 PM »

There's no danger of damaging steel bolts with alloy wheels. I can't see a disadvantage. On the other hand the Beta wheels are pretty light so I've never had too much trouble. My 406 Coupe (many other cars too I expect) comes with a locating pin you screw into a bolt hole before mounting the wheel - you could fabricate one of those without trouble.
That's a neat idea. All you'd need would be a long M12 x 1.25 bolt with the head cut off and a slot machined into the end to take a screwdriver. Makes wheel changing a breeze. The reason I ask is that I've just taken a set of 15" Thema 16v Turbo wheels to be powder coated and I'm planning to use those on the Beta longer term. Just looking at options for the new wheels.
Logged

1980 Lancia Beta Spider 2000 (S2FL)
2002 VW Transporter T4
2008 Aprilia SL1000 Falco
1992 Ducati 888 SP3
1988 Honda VFR750F
lanciamad
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lanciamad
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

England England

Posts: 677


Marcus Robinson


« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2018, 03:52:03 PM »

Been working well for me, if you think beta wheels are a pain try 16v integrale wheels.... So much easier now, would just advise to spend your time looking at the quality you are buying, they're normally cheap for a reason...
IMG_0034 by Marcus Robinson, on Flickr
IMG_0033 by Marcus Robinson, on Flickr
IMG_0035 by Marcus Robinson, on Flickr
Logged

1982 - Lancia Beta HPE 2000ie - Track - http://www.betaboyz.myzen.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=472.0
1988 - Lancia Delta HF Turbo - Sorn - http://www.lanciasport.com/forum/index.php?topic=2585.0
1989 - Lancia Delta 1300 LX - Sorn
1988 - BMW E30 325i - Track
2005 - Subaru Forester XT STI - Road
mangocrazy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 516


« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2018, 08:37:19 PM »

Marcus,

That looks a far better long term solution. I'd be looking for 10.9 high tensile studs at a minimum. Did you use threadlock on the studs where it bolts into the hub? And can you recall the overall lengths of the studs?

Cheers,

Graham
Logged

1980 Lancia Beta Spider 2000 (S2FL)
2002 VW Transporter T4
2008 Aprilia SL1000 Falco
1992 Ducati 888 SP3
1988 Honda VFR750F
lanciamad
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lanciamad
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

England England

Posts: 677


Marcus Robinson


« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2018, 10:39:56 PM »

Marcus,

That looks a far better long term solution. I'd be looking for 10.9 high tensile studs at a minimum. Did you use threadlock on the studs where it bolts into the hub? And can you recall the overall lengths of the studs?

Cheers,

Graham

Graham,
Most studs are 10.9, there are some sellers that don't know or won't list the tensile, the one's to avoid, so go for a reputable seller if you want to go the same route.
I used the red thread locker by Loctite on the short part of the stud in the hub and controversial or not, copper grease on the part of the stud the nut would thread up to the wheel, nut tightened up with an impact gun and a torque wrench not had any problems with any loosening of studs or nuts over the last couple of years.
I bought an extra two nuts to use as the locking nuts for winding each stud in. I can't remember the length, but it will differ per car/wheel setup. The stud length will need to be the length of the original bolt (including head) plus depth of any spacers used. I have a wider front spacer than rear for example so different length studs to match. You can always buy a Chinese 1 jobby to check your happy with length of stud before forking out for a decent full set, I aimed at having the top of the nut flush with or just below the end of the stud when fully tight.
All the best, Marcus
Logged

1982 - Lancia Beta HPE 2000ie - Track - http://www.betaboyz.myzen.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=472.0
1988 - Lancia Delta HF Turbo - Sorn - http://www.lanciasport.com/forum/index.php?topic=2585.0
1989 - Lancia Delta 1300 LX - Sorn
1988 - BMW E30 325i - Track
2005 - Subaru Forester XT STI - Road
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!