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Author Topic: Spyder restoration - long time coming  (Read 14954 times)
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peteracs
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« Reply #80 on: March 04, 2017, 02:24:27 PM »

Hi

Ok, bit more of an update, managed to get regular time on the car now, even with the cold temperatures (not too wet thankfully), I have to work with the garage doors open so pray for light winds.......

Jobs done since the last update, again bound to miss a few, but here goes. There are some much better photos from a real camera attached of the engine bay as of today.

Tidied up the wiring loom in the cabin around the steering column. Had to drop the column as where it passes over the column support was very tight. Found that it had previously had a small 'mod' done to the two indicator wires , they appear to have been cut and a piece of wire inserted (maybe due to chaffing?), the method of connection was twist the wires together, tape with insulating tape and hope...... Replaced with soldered joints and heat shrink, then the whole lot loom taped up to where it emerges into the engine bay.

Installed the steering column bulkhead seal when I worked out what it looked like, then put the steering column and rack all tightened up (after I sorted the foot brake and clutch mechanisms, see below).

Installed the fusebox support and started installing the fusebox and nearby relays, however need to get a decent blowup of the wiring circuit made as there are way too many red wires..... and there is little slack in the wiring at this point. The wiring in the engine bay as you can see is a complete rats nest at the moment, will need to have the tape taken off all and relaid out then taped up when I have the fusebox and relays installed.

Jobs now turned to the engine bay.

Removed, painted, greased and replaced the clutch and foot brake mechanisms. This is a right hand car, so a bit more to it than left hand ones I think. Clutch cable greased the best I could. A pretty fiddly job for the foot brake and having the column loose helped.

Removed the clutch cable tripod piece on the gearbox, cleaned and painted, then found it was twisted, so had to start again with one of a spare engine..... Removed, cleaned and painted the gear lever on the top of the gearbox, also removed the clutch activation lever which was and absolute pig. It has splines and they were rusted, had to leave soaking in WD40 for about 5 days, eventually it came off. Now cleaned and painted. Bothe the clutch and gear lever have had Copperslip applied so they should come off easily next time....

Clutch cable installed with its protecting grommet near the battery box.

Installed the already cleaned and painted cowling for the radiator, the radiator and the electric fan. Checked out what pipe work I had and ordered some new stainless jubilee clips. Still need the odd pipe to replace poor ones, but will get around to that soon.

Installed the already painted bonnet stay and the spring loop for the bonnet.

Installed the bonnet angle pieces which go from the strut tops to the front of the car.

Then a major event. I had previously installed one of the update kits for the gear linkage and now actually installed all the gear change items from the gear lever in the cabin to the gear lever on the gearbox. This includes the swivel arrangement just below the rack at the back of the engine. I thought I may have to take the rack out, but thankfully there is just enough room. Various parts were cleaned and painted along the way and plenty of grease applied to the swivel and the metal joints of the connecting bar supplied with the kit. All looks very tidy to my eyes (see photo).

That will do for now, but next up are getting the hubs back together, that is for the next post......

Peter


* Engine 1.jpg (237.37 KB, 1280x960 - viewed 217 times.)

* Engine 2.jpg (138.67 KB, 1280x960 - viewed 250 times.)

* Engine 3.jpg (161.02 KB, 1280x960 - viewed 242 times.)

* Engine 4.jpg (206.02 KB, 1280x960 - viewed 257 times.)
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Beta Spyder S2 pre F/L 1600
Saab 9-3 1.9Tid Cabrio
HFStuart
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« Reply #81 on: March 04, 2017, 02:38:02 PM »

It's really coming together. Don't forget to connect the reversing light switch while you can get to it!
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peteracs
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« Reply #82 on: March 04, 2017, 03:25:40 PM »

It's really coming together. Don't forget to connect the reversing light switch while you can get to it!

Hi Stuart

Thanks, yes easy enough with the side panel off and no battery tray.

On that subject the guys who restored the body actually welded the battery tray onto the supports, all well and good unless you want to get the engine out I think, so that is why the supports are a mess, I drilled out the welds. Have to trim the supports and sort some sort of brackets for the battery tray. I have a fresh one all painted ready to go on when the time is right!

Peter
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Beta Spyder S2 pre F/L 1600
Saab 9-3 1.9Tid Cabrio
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« Reply #83 on: March 06, 2017, 09:03:52 AM »

Hi All

A wet Sunday here, so what would normally be a garden day, has been swapped for a car day (the garden day is now Monday, i.e. today....)

One of the jobs I was least looking forward to was tightening the hub nuts up tight enough. I know the effort required to get them off which resulted in a visit to the local garage. The main issue was how to fasten the hub with putting strain on the gearbox etc. So.... I dreamt up a framework using angle iron, in the end all I actually needed was a decent piece of old angle iron (the remnants of one of my neighbours gates as it happens) drilled to accept two of the hub bolts and relieved so the socket would fit on the nut. This was fastened using some old hub bolts which were packed with washers and I used the spacer which goes in front on the disc normally to pack them out so there was just the thread showing and did not stick out the back of the hub too much. Then you could tighten it all up nicely. Photo of it in situ below. I could then apply a load of effort to the nut with out undue strain to the drivetrain. I am lucky enough to have a monster torque wrench (see below) which just goes up to the required torque. With this all in place it was a very simple job to torque up to the correct value, a great relief all round.


* Hub2.jpg (190.9 KB, 1280x960 - viewed 188 times.)

* TorqueWrench.jpg (187.03 KB, 1280x960 - viewed 218 times.)
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Beta Spyder S2 pre F/L 1600
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« Reply #84 on: March 06, 2017, 09:07:08 AM »

After that it was fairly plain sailing to assemble the new disks, spacers, brake yoke and the already rebuilt calipers using Copperslip on the wedge pieces to hope keep them from seizing in future. Both sides completed by the end of the day. Only job now are the brake pipes and final connection of the roll (sway) bar. Altogether a satisfying day.
 


* Hub1.jpg (164.8 KB, 1280x960 - viewed 184 times.)
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Beta Spyder S2 pre F/L 1600
Saab 9-3 1.9Tid Cabrio
smithymc
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« Reply #85 on: March 06, 2017, 11:28:23 AM »

Inspirational stuff Peter- keep it going!

Makes my fiddling with window regulators and Rev counters seem pretty minor- not that any of it has been successful- yet.

Mark
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mangocrazy
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« Reply #86 on: March 06, 2017, 03:25:20 PM »

Very much liking the 'special tool' to get the hub nuts tightened up, Peter. Using the mass of the car as mechanical advantage (or disadvantage, depending on your view). Must try and remember that one. We had a similarly wet Sunday, which I used as a carb, thermostat and exhaust day (but motorbike, not car).
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1980 Lancia Beta Spider 2000 (S2FL)
2002 VW Transporter T4
2017 KTM Duke 690R
2008 Aprilia SL1000 Falco
1992 Ducati 888 SP3
1988 Honda VFR750F
1980 Yamaha RD350LC
peteracs
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« Reply #87 on: March 06, 2017, 04:19:38 PM »

One thing I forgot to mention was the wishbone ball joint. As with the CV joint, different suppliers/manufacturers, all saying for the Beta.

I already had a new one from a few years ago which fits really nicely and looks like the originals on the car, the second one I ordered end of last year and it was a Delphi part TC195 which according to info is 100% for the car. It fits into the hole just fine and locates on the hole in the hub again perfect, the problem is that when tightened the stud part protrudes too far and interferes with the CV joint, not too useful. In the interest of actually making progress and the next one may also have issues, I cut just over 5mm from the top of the stud part, now fits perfectly. If you need to make this mod, do not forget to put a nut on BEFORE you cut the thread and then file down the rough edge. This makes putting the nut back on a whole lot simpler. On the ball joint there is obviously no spanner point on the stud, so I used a bit of an old rubber pipe wrapped round the tapered section and held it with grips, that way you can screw/unscrew the nut without damaging the taper.

Peter
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Beta Spyder S2 pre F/L 1600
Saab 9-3 1.9Tid Cabrio
dommorello
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Re:
« Reply #88 on: March 08, 2017, 09:16:50 AM »

Great work Peter! Awesome progress. In our experience great to get thinks fitted but as like your issue with rack ya can't get to excited once something has been fitted as it is most probably going to come off again to fit something else. Keep up good work!!

Sent from my HTC 2PS6200 using Tapatalk
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peteracs
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« Reply #89 on: March 19, 2017, 02:34:49 PM »

Not much achieved recently as had some work work and refurbishing a kitchen and cleaning a flat to do, all very boring and getting in the way..... Still they do bring in some useful cash.

Anyway enough of my moaning. I made a little progress to date.

1) Ordered and received the T pieces for the heater pipework mod, see photo. Going to refit the heater before I sort out the pipework.

2) Installed the new HEL brake flexible hoses which I ordered ages ago from Camskill. The original ones were incorrect, had to return and send a pattern. The replacements are spot on. a couple of points -

           a) They do not have the small locating dowel of the originals which locate on the calliper. I do not think this is a big issue.
           b) The end which attaches to the inner wing have a round profile with a nut at one end, the original Beta ones have two flats for using a
               spanner. This means the locating bracket on the inner wing are also not fully round. The solution is a small amount of fettling with a round
               file to make them fit. The original retaining clips are a perfect fit on the new hoses.
           c) There is a retaining clip on the strut for the two hoses. I reused the original rubber grommet, but the hoses are much thinner than the
               originals, so I used some old inner tube to pad out the hose and make it a snug fit. I also had to slit the old rubber grommet to get it off
               the original hoses, so I used a ty-wrap to hold the long thin end together. End result I think is quite neat and should do the job.



* T Pieces.jpg (306.59 KB, 1280x960 - viewed 131 times.)

* Brake front 1.jpg (169.94 KB, 1280x960 - viewed 156 times.)

* Brake front 2.jpg (163.91 KB, 1280x960 - viewed 163 times.)
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Beta Spyder S2 pre F/L 1600
Saab 9-3 1.9Tid Cabrio
peteracs
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« Reply #90 on: March 19, 2017, 02:50:43 PM »

One thing I did manage to have a play with last week, which is my next task, is to look to replace all the brakes pipes.

Never have tried this before, so leap in the dark. I have a Bubble flaring tool by Sykes Pickavant which I was given by my father and have bought a couple of bending tools, pipe cutter and a number of screw ends. Until I started looking I did not realise there were different 'flares' used on brake lines, the 'Bubble" being the one used on moderns normally and older European cars from what I can understand.

So far results have been 1 x really good one, several average to poor ones made. I need to get some more practice before I go for broke on the long lengths. It looks like I need to measure the length and make up one end before I start bending as some of the routing will be a challenge and will not leave much room to flare the end after bending in situ.

Here are the two bending tools, happy with the yellow one, will have to go carefully with the blue handled one which is handy when there is not a lot of room to effect a bend.


* Brake Bending Tools.jpg (210.81 KB, 1280x960 - viewed 131 times.)
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Beta Spyder S2 pre F/L 1600
Saab 9-3 1.9Tid Cabrio
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